Eventos

Tecnologia da Informação

9th Organizations, Artifacts and Practices (OAP) Workshop

Local

FGV EAESP

Endereço

Avenida 9 de Julho, 2029 (Acess 1) or Rua Itapeva 432 (Acess 2)

Data do evento

24/07/2019 até 26/07/2019

Horário

09:30 até 18:00

Objetivo

How academics might face more purposively contemporary societal and political problems? This is a crucial reflection to put forward in those ‘Trumpean’ days and even more with the recent election of a right-wing president in Brazil.

Conteúdo

How academics might face more purposively contemporary societal and political problems? This is a crucial reflection to put forward in those ‘Trumpean’ days and even more with the recent election of a right-wing president in Brazil.

From the pioneer meeting in 2011 – which theme was social networks and artifacts in organizations – eight other annual workshops took place in different cities from 2012 to 2018. The themes selected to brand each workshop witness the vitality and intellectual curiosity of the OAP participants: materiality and space in management and organizational studies (Paris, 2012); time, history and materiality (London, 2013); rules, regulation and materiality (Rome, 2014); managerial techniques and materiality (Sydney, 2015); materiality and institutions (Lisbon, 2016); collaboration and materiality (Singapore, 2017); and new ways 2 of working and the digital age (Amsterdam, 2018).

By exploring the relationships between organizations, artifacts and practices, OAP scholars often focus on work and organizing practices, practices that are becoming more and more digital, distributed, community-oriented, open and collaborative. Although relevant to increase our understanding of our contemporary social world, the persistent focus on organizational practices might be seen as a limitation to be overcome by the OAP community. We are not saying that such philosophical discussions are without importance. They have resulted in the distinction between different ontological stances stressing the interpenetration of the social and the material (Introna, 2013), the irrelevance of the terms themselves (Lorino, 2013), the necessity to keep a focus on material and social ‘domains’ or ‘agencies’ (Mutch, 2013), or the necessity to move to other interrelated debates such as transcendental versus immanent views of processes and sociomaterial practices (de Vaujany and Mitev, 2016). All those discussions are provoking and important for our understanding of current ‘reality’.

However, in the sense of urgency that we can feel today regarding a politically unstable, environmentally threatened, socially unfair and economically unbalanced among classes and countries, we could ask ourselves what kind of relevant contribution sociomateriality and materiality research could bring to a better world. This sense of urgency could be considered even bigger in Latin America, and particularly huge in Brazil, given the institutional and economic prolonged crisis the country is going through, providing a rich environment for sociomaterial analysis. Paradoxically, our insight is that these projection into more concrete, societal, political debates will be a way to go beyond pointless philosophical discussions for the sake of philosophical debates, and could strengthen sociomateriality and the materiality turn.

As we are planning to bring an OAP workshop to Brazil in 2019, it is timely to broaden the focus from what is happening in organizations to what is shaking and destabilizing our communities and society, integrating a number of social and political issues that could be also seen as ‘sociomaterial’, such as the politics of materiality and embodiment (Irni, 2013; Dale, 2005), the politics of performativity (Boucher, 2006) or the broader issues of organizing, infrastructures and practices interrelated to the rising new world of work and the sharing economy.

Another interesting point that the integration of Latin American voices to the OAP debates could bring is a potential critique to dominant Euro-modern ways of thinking about academic production and consumption. The possibility of decentering the prevailing academic discourse and envisioning new possibilities of argumentation could reorient imaginaries and practices. For instance, the strong stream associated with post-colonial and post-development thinking provides a view of profound and radical delusion and disappointment with the exploitative thinking paradigm that has dominated Europe and the Americas for the last 500 years, based on the process of colonization, imperialism, neoliberalism and marked-based globalization with a focus on economic growth in spite of human well-being (Esteva 1992; Escobar, 2011; Gomes, 2012). This dominance also characterizes academia (Alves and Pozzebon, 2013; Alcadipani et al., 2013). Not only for language reasons, but mainly due to experiential, historical interpretive frames that are quite distinct, researchers operating in the so-called developed regions dominate the intellectual debate and impose their rules and vocabulary. We are not romanticizing alternative, local, indigenous discourses – with their own situated understandings, shaped and developed in accordance with their particular historic and cultural experiences – but just outlining their barriers to be heard by ‘global’ Western-based researchers and to escape of their subaltern condition (Pozzebon and Fontenelle, 2018).

Convidados

Eduardo Diniz
Formado em Engenharia Elétrica, com ênfase em eletrônica, na Escola de Engenharia de São Carlos USP (1983), Mestre em Administração de Empresas pela Fundação Getúlio Vargas - SP (1994) e Ph.D. em Administração de Empresas pela Fundação Getúlio Vargas - SP (2000).
Marlei Pozzebon
Graduada em História (1988) e Ciências da Computação (1995) pela Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), mestre em Administração (1998) pela UFRGS e doutora em Administração (2003) pela McGill University. Atualmente Professora titular na HEC Montreal e professora associada da Fundação Getúlio Vargas - EAESP/SP.
Nathalie Mitev
King's College London, Senior Visiting Research Fellow and Paris-Dauphine Universite, Chercheur Associe. Nathalie Mitev was an Associate Professor at the London School of Economics, Information Systems and Innovation Group, in the Department of Management for 17 years.
François-Xavier de Vaujany
François-Xavier de Vaujany is a full Professor of Management & Organization Studies at PSL, Université Paris-Dauphine. His research is focused on the emergence and legitimation of digital innovations and new forms of organizations.

Programação

24.07.2019

  • 09:30
    Introduction to Sociomateriality
    Natalie Mitev & François Xavier
  • 11:00
    Post-developmental approaches
    Marlei Pozzebon
  • 14:00
    Epistemologies of the South
    Armindo Teodósio
  • 15:30
    Social Impacts of Blockchain
    Eduardo Diniz

25.07.2019

  • 09:20
    Opening session
    9h00 – 9h20
  • 09:30
    Parallel sessions
    9h30 – 10h45
  • 10:45
    Coffee break
    10h45 – 11h00:
  • 11:00
    Key note speaker – Jerome Blanc (moderator: Eduardo Diniz)
    11h00 – 12h30
  • 12:30
    Lunch
    12h30 – 14h00
  • 14:00
    Parallel sessions
    14h00 – 15h15
  • 15:15
    Coffee break
    15h15 – 15h30
  • 15:30
    Atelier 1 – Crafting money (LABIS/RJ)
    15h30-17h30
  • 18:00
    Cocktail (France Consulate)

26.07.2019

  • 09:00
    Opening session
    9h00 – 9h20
  • 09:30
    Parallel sessions
    9h30 – 10h45
  • 10:45
    Coffee break
    10h45 – 11h00
  • 11:00
    Key note speaker – Ann Cunliffe (moderator: Marlei Pozzebon)
    11h00 – 12h30
  • 12:30
    Lunch
    12h30 – 14h00
  • 14:00
    Parallel sessions
    14h00 – 15h15
  • 15:15
    Coffee break
    15h15 – 15h30
  • 15:30
    Atelier 2 – Replicating tecnologias sociais (ADEL/CE)
    15h30 – 17h30
  • 17:30
    Closing session
    17h30 – 18h00
  • 18:00
    Cocktail (FGV/EAESP)

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